Friday, December 12, 2014

The [Epidendrosaurus] material described in this paper was collected from a new locality, Daohugou, in east Nei Mongol, northeast China, which is west of Liaoning Province. Many salamanders(Wang 2000), plants and insects (Zhang 2002)have recently been discovered from this new locality. It is notable that an anurognathid rhamphorhynchoid pterosaur [Jeholopterus] with beautiful hair [pycnofibers] covering the whole body has also been reported from this locality (Wang et al. 2002). The estimated age of the deposit at this locality is very controversial and ranges from the Middle Jurassic or the Early Cretaceous according to various authors (Wang etal. 2000; Zhang 2002); however, most workers currently regard it as being Late Jurassic.
Epidendrosaurus is a Scansoriopterygidae and one of the most basal members of Paraves.
We report a new and nearly completely articulated rhamphorhynchoid pterosaur, Jeholopterus ningchengensis gen. et sp. nov., with excellently preserved fibres in the wing membrane and “hairs” in the neck, body and tail regions.,+northeast+China&author=WANG+X&author=ZHOU+Z&author=ZHANG+F&author=XU+X&publication_year=2002&journal=Chin+Sci+Bull&volume=47&pages=226-230
Jeholopterus was a small anurognathid pterosaur from the Middle to Late Jurassic[1]Daohugou Beds of the Tiaojishan Formation of Inner MongoliaChina , preserved with hair-like pycnofibres and skin remains.
The only known Yi qi fossil was found in rocks assigned to the Tiaojishan Formation, dating to the Callovian-Oxfordian age of the Middle-Late Jurassic,[1] dated to between 165 and 153 million years ago.[3] This is the same formation (and around the same age) as the other known scansoriopterygids Epidexipteryx and Scansoriopteryx.

Yi qi