Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Questions?

If anyone has questions, I will do my best to answer them.
Please use a name other than "anonymous". It need not be your actual name.

21 comments:

  1. Peter NinkompoupJuly 13, 2013 at 5:52 AM

    Is Deinonychosaurus a member of Deinonychosauria or is it a true dinosaur?

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  2. As you can see, I have hypothesized the following:
    Rhamphorhynchoidea developed into Deinonychosauria and Pterodactyloidea developed into Pygostylia (Avialae).

    I am not hypothesizing that modern birds developed from Deinonychosauria.
    Therefore it does not matter to my hypothesis whether Deinonychosaurus is a member of Deinonychosauria or is a true dinosaur.

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  3. Peter NinkompoupJuly 13, 2013 at 1:09 PM

    Which specific Deinonychosaurian(s) did Pygostylia develop from?

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  4. As I said:
    I am not hypothesizing that modern birds (Pygostylia) developed from Deinonychosauria.

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  5. Here is a question for any dino to bird enthusiast:
    Which specific Coelurosaurian(s) did Pygostylia develop from?

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  6. What do you think of Aurornis xui and Eosinopteryx brevipenna? Some scientists have cautioned that Aurornis may be fraudulent, but, in any case, do you think they could represent valid transitional fossils for a dino to bird sequence?

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  7. Chris Carlascio, Aurornis xui and Eosinopteryx brevipenna are both members of Paraves. The problem for the dino to bird theory is that there is no connection between actual dinosaurs and Paraves.

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  8. So, do you think that Aurornis xui and Eosinopteryx brevipenna came from Pterodactyloidea? Also, aren't there dinosaurs classified under Paraves? Would classifying any dinosaurs under Paraves be a mistake in your view?

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  9. What "dinosaurs" are classified under Paraves?

    I am proposing that Rhamphorhynchoidea developed into Deinonychosauria and that Pterodactyloidea developed into Pygostylia (Avialae).

    Aurornis xui is a member of Avialae, so I am proposing it developed from Pterodactyloidea

    If Eosinopteryx brevipenna is a Troodontid (a member of Deinonychosauria), it would have developed from Rhamphorhynchoidea.

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  10. Interesting new study regarding bird beaks. Unfortunately, they fall into the same trap most people do.

    http://m.nbcnews.com/science/why-did-some-dinosaurs-have-beaks-all-better-eat-food-2D11685955

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  11. Replies
    1. Any part. I am interested in anything you might say about this.

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  12. First,

    Do you see the trap?

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  13. You are wasting my time. If you have something to contribute I will post it.

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  14. What's next with the pterosaur-bird idea?

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  15. That's too bad.

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  16. If you would like to contribute, please do. Is there any particular aspect that interests you?

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  17. I am interested in why this particular evolutionary lineage has captured your interest and what you think the implications are for reading your interpretation rather than the standard interpretation. Do those quesions make sense?

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  18. This is not the only evolutionary lineage that has caught my attention. But it is the one that I have researched and analyzed the most.
    The implication is that it is more plausible to conclude that birds developed from pterosaurs than from dinosaurs,

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